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20130115
20130123
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the science is done during summer. that's when the animals are here. that's when the day is longest. so there's more opportunity to work. >> reporter: the experts are trying to understand the impact of climate change by examining links between ice volume and wildlife. this unmanned apparatus can check the condition of underwaterce. it can precisely measure thickness and record changes in volume. scientists also use krill as a sort of canary in the coalmine. the small crustaceans live below the ice, and they are a key food source for marine animals. but estimates suggest their population is in decline. antarctic division in tasmaa breeds krill in antarctic conditions. researchers officially change the environment to monitor the impact on crustaceans. they are trying to find out if the thinning of the ice could affect krill numbers. bigger animals at the south pole provide even more data. scientists in the university of tasmania have attached small devices on elephant seals to record their movements and the temperature of the sea where they swim. they're aiming to determine how changes in the i
. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: battle lines were drawn at either end of pennsylvania avenue today over the national debt and government spending. the opening shots came from president obama at his white house news conference. >> i thought it might make sense to take some questions this week as my first term comes to an end. >> brown: the questions were dominated by the looming debt ceiling fight. the president sternly warned republicans not to balk at raising the nation's borrowing limit. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united sta
. the things that we have to fix are the basics. they're not hard, they're not rocket science, but we just have to achieve consensus. my optimism comes from the fact that historically america has been willing to face the hard problems, be dynamic, change things, not get stuck in gridlock. right now it's unsettling how unabler two make progress. but i think there's an underlying optimism i have that just because of the very historical nature of this country and certainly there's no reason why we can't be competitive. you know, it's really going to be our choice in terms of how we behave, what kind of policies we set, how we work together between business and government and, you know, i'm optimistic that we'll sort it out but, boy, it sure looks ugly right now. >> susie: for more on michaelportier's research and articles go to nbr.com and check out our partnership with some of the nation's top business schools like harvard. >> tom: while beer wasn't invented in america, u.s. brewers are thinking small to make it big. small craft brewers are claiming a bigger stake of the industry's annual $300 bi
? >> we associate utopia with science fiction, showing those visions gone wrong. we associate utopia with how we perceive communism, especially soviet communism. because utopia has been so discredited, so dragged through the mud politically, especially during the years of the cold war that anyone who speaks in that language is dismissed in one form or another. >> would you call frederick douglass utopian? barack obama utopian? >> well, frederick douglass, i imagine was like the other abolitionists, regarded as dabbling in dreams. and would have been dismissed as a dreamer, or worse, a fraud. because when his first autobiography came out, when the narrative came out, many people questioned whether he had written it himself. it was impossible that a slave could have written these words. it must have been one of his abolitionist friends, one of his white abolitionist friends. it must have been garrison, et cetera. well, it turns out that indeed, douglass wrote those words. >> do you feel the same way four years later about that moment in rochester? >> yes. absolutely. >> do you feel the
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macne
in history and i think people who sort of follow the science of sport realized that is anything but the case but this is a system with a massive, massive number of false negatives and very few false positives and if you are really trying hard and have a lot of resources then you shouldn't fail the test. me and a colleague lena roberts reported last year he also had people in the anti-doping labs helping him figure out how to skip by those tests you should never fail if you have that kind of test. >> i mean, when you look at what he has done, what is is the reaction of his fries, tse people closest to him? >> anybody talk to them? >> well, it is an interesting place, because knows are the people that get forgotten, especially the x friends, i know he reached out to half a dozen people who were harmed the most, this is not a story about lying, as the story about protecting the lie by viciously attacking other people who can't fight back, attacking with lawyers and powers and all means necessary that lance attacks but reached out over the last few days, i think a couple of conversations have ha
. and on our science page, see how hip hop and the pillsbury doughboy helped a group of fifth graders learn math. how do we work on making social security solvent? economist jared bernstein offers a menu of choices on making sense. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. ray? >> suarez: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, we'll update the kidnapping of americans and other foreigners in algeria. i'm ray suarez. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. thank y and gd night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the enginehat nnects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your bs station om viewers like u. thank y
poison at "lunch in the lab." plus, tell us what you think of our science coverage. take r pollwhich you can find at the bottom of the story. "need to know" on pbs tonight takes a look at our nation's aging infrastructure and its impact on our economy. it's part one of two editions funded by the supporters of the nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy group common good. jeff greenfield reports how the sluggish pace of change threatens our future. >> . >> on may 29th, 1935, two years after they had begun pouring, crews placed the last concrete in hoover dam. this modern civil engineering wonder stood completed, two and one half years ahead of schedule. >> it was the most ambitious public works project in human history. built in the depths of the great depression. to tame the colorado river, created an immense man-made lake, provided the electric power to the california defense plants that helped win world war 12. hoover dam is one of countless examples of the kind of public works that defined america. from the erie canal to the transcontinental railroad, to the interstate highway system. such pr
with musicales and militias, no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future or builds the roads and networks and research labs that will bring jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these tings together as one nation and one people. this generation of americans has been tested by crise, is that steal our resolve and proved our resistance. decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun, america's pssibities are limitless for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands. youth and drive, adversity and openness. endless capacity for risk and a gift for re-invention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and we will seize it as long as we seize it together. for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well in a growing many barely make it. we believe the prosperity must rest on the pros parrots of the thriving middle class. we know that america thrives when every person can find independence and plied in their work,
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)